Sometimes, when you are having sex, you cannot determine whether you are just urinating or you are already experiencing an orgasm. Peeing while having sex is usually a female concern, but there are times when men urinate too while erect. The good thing about men is that they have natural mechanisms that prevent them from urinating while having an erection.

According to statistics, about 60 percent of women experience urinary incontinence, meaning that they cannot control their bladder during sexual intercourse. But these women are not peeing. Instead, they are having an ejaculation.

What Causes You to Urinate During Sex?

Peeing during sex is not unusual and often unintentional. It was found out that around 25 million adults in the US experience incontinence and 80 percent of this are women. And one out of four women who are 18 years of age and above experience unintentional urination during sex.

Urinary Incontinence

Urine leakage is possible during sexual intercourse or orgasm. This is because sexual stimulation or sexual activity can give pressure to your urethra or bladder. If you have weakened pelvic floor muscles, you will most likely experience stress incontinence. 

If you experience urine leakage during orgasm, this is most likely because the muscle in your bladder contracts, and this is known as urge incontinence. This is a sign that you have an overactive bladder. Sometimes, you feel an urgent need to pee, which makes you expel urine.

Stress incontinence

This happens when your bladder is given pressure, such as when you are having sexual intercourse. Stress incontinence is triggered depending upon the person. Usually, you will experience urine leakage when laughing, sneezing, coughing, performing physical activities, lifting heavy objects, and having sex.

Male Incontinence During Sex

wide disappointed in bed

If you have an erection, the chances of urinating are low, especially that the sphincter in your bladder prohibits the urine from passing through the urethra. This only means that you cannot urinate during sexual intercourse.

But there is a possibility that you will experience incontinence such as when your prostate is removed due to prostate cancer. Men who have their prostate removed oftentimes experience incontinence, including urination during sex. They even experience urine leakage during foreplay or even climax.

According to the American Cancer Society, about 1 out of 9 men in the US is diagnosed with prostate cancer. One of the well-known treatments of prostate cancer is the removal of the prostate. If this happens, then you will have an increased chance of experiencing incontinence.

It is common for men who have their prostate removed to experience urinary incontinence, especially if pressure is placed on the bladder. It can also be experienced while you are under treatment for prostate cancer.

This is because the treatment might result in the weakening of the bladder muscles, which causes urinary leakage when coughing, sneezing, exercising, or having sex. This situation can be embarrassing, especially while under the healing process.

Tips to Avoid Awkward Situations in the Bedroom

  • You should limit your fluid intake before having sexual intercourse.
  • You should avoid foods and drinks which can irritate your bladders, such as alcohol, chocolate, or caffeine
  •  Before having sex, make sure to empty your bladder
  • Keep a towel that is accessible in case of uncontrolled urination during sex

Treating Incontinence

If you are not comfortable with urine leakage during sex, it is best to seek help from your doctor. Your doctor is in the best position to determine whether it is just a result of orgasm or maybe you are urinating.

Your doctor may give you various treatment options to help you control your incontinence, such as:

Strengthening your pelvic floor muscles

Your doctor will recommend you to ask for help from a physical therapist. Kegel exercise, biofeedback techniques, or weighted vaginal cones can aid in the strengthening of your pelvic floor muscles. These are just a few ways to help improve fecal incontinence, enhance sexual pleasure, increase blood flow to sex organs, and improve bladder control.

According to several studies, Kegels can help men not only to improve urinary incontinence but also to treat erectile dysfunction. Men suffering from erectile dysfunction resolved their symptoms only after six months of performing Kegel exercises, together with pelvic floor physical therapy.

Kegel exercises are easy to perform as they can be done while sitting, standing, or even lying down. It is also convenient to perform as it can be done at any place and at any time. But take note to empty your bladder first before performing such physical activities.

Retraining your bladder

incontinence in men

Training your bladder can help you control it. This will allow you to do other activities before you even have to urinate. It could be combined with Kegel exercises to be more effective.

Bladder training means that you should fix a schedule when you are to use the restroom, whether or not you have the urge to pee. You should know how to practice some relaxation techniques to control the urge before the scheduled time.

Changes in lifestyle

Do you know that there are sexual positions that do not place any pressure on your bladder? Try to perform various sex positions. You should lose weight if you are overweight. You should empty your bladder before sexual intercourse. You should avoid drinking too much liquid before having sex.

Conclusion

Yes, men can urinate while erect. But this is unusual especially that the sphincter in your bladder is closed, which means that urine is prohibited from passing through the urethra. But there are instances when you will experience urine leakage, especially if you are experiencing incontinence.

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