Imagine switching from one sex position to another and suddenly hearing a weird, fart-like sound coming from your partner’s vagina. That’s called a queef, and it simply refers to air being released from a woman’s sex organ.

It certainly doesn’t sound sexy, no thanks to the fact that it sounds as if your partner just farted in the middle of what you thought was some wild lovemaking. But it certainly isn’t the same as farting and it doesn’t smell at all. It’s totally natural, and women shouldn’t be embarrassed about it. Here’s what you should know about queefing.

What Is It Exactly?

If you can imagine letting the air out of a balloon, that’s almost similar to what a queef is, except that the air isn’t coming out of a balloon. Instead, it’s coming out of your partner’s vagina. It’s just air making a certain sound, really.

Queefing is normal and it’s no cause for concern at all. When your partner queefs, it doesn’t mean you have to stop having sex, even if your partner is feeling like she wants to die of shame right then and there.

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Most women find queefing extremely embarrassing, but you shouldn’t make fun of your partner if it happens to her in the middle of your lovemaking. If you want, you can think of it as proof that you were very diligent, if not rough and intense, while you were hammering your penis into her sex organ.

How Does a Queef Happen?

A little bit of physics is actually involved when a queef happens. When a woman is sexually stimulated, she secretes fluids that basically lubricate the insides of her vagina. The vaginal walls naturally come in contact with one another. This causes a suctioning effect that happens naturally.

And when you add your penis, your fingers, or a sex toy to the equation, then you get a situation wherein air gets pushed inside the vaginal canal. The more vigorously you thrust inside your partner’s vagina, the higher the chances that air gets pushed inside it.

There’s usually a little bit of air inside the vaginal canal, but too much air in there can feel a little uncomfortable, although it’s not typically associated with a health risk. Nevertheless, the air needs to be pushed out of the vaginal canal. And queefing accomplishes exactly that.

Although the sound isn’t nice to hear at all, queefing is absolutely normal, although it does tend to occur at the most inopportune and embarrassing moments. In fact, queefing can also happen even when a woman isn’t having sex.

Intravaginal feminine hygiene products can also result in air pockets being trapped inside the vaginal canal. Yoga and other stretching exercises can also cause a woman’s vagina to relax and open, which can then lead to air entering the vaginal canal.

Coughing, strenuous activities, squatting, and changing positions can cause the trapped air to be expelled from the vaginal opening.

When Is Queefing Dangerous?

Queefing while mid-sex doesn’t pose any health risks at all. However, when queefing happens during certain circumstances, it could be a sign of something far more serious. Queefing after childbirth is actually quite common, but it’s also a sign that giving birth has caused the woman’s pelvic floor muscles to weaken.

When queefing is accompanied by pain or discomfort, blood, a foul odor, urine leakage, or feces, that’s definitely a cause for concern. Any woman experiencing such should immediately see a doctor.

The same goes if the vaginal tissues are swollen or inflamed, or if the woman has just recently had an abdominal, pelvic, or gynecological surgery. Queefing while undergoing radiation therapy to the pelvic area may also warrant a visit to the doctor.

Vaginal fistulas are the most problematic causes of queefing. A fistula occurs when one of your organs gets linked with another organ that it’s not supposed to be connected to. A vaginal fistula can happen when a hollow chamber forms between the vagina and another pelvic organ.

This is quite dangerous because it can lead to even more serious conditions like cancer. For instance, a vesicovaginal fistula is associated with cervical cancer, as well as cancer involving the uterus and vagina.

A vesicovaginal fistula happens when the urinary bladder becomes connected to the vagina. This can result in pain, discomfort, urine leakage, or abnormal watery discharge. It may also cause constant queefing.

For women who suffer from an inflammatory bowel disease or who have had an abdominopelvic surgery, chances of developing an enterovaginal fistula are higher. This type of vaginal fistula occurs when an abnormal opening connects the vagina and the small intestine.

Enterovaginal fistula is typically accompanied by abdominal pain. In addition, a woman who has enterovaginal fistula may also often experience passing gas from the vagina.

Can Queefing During Sex Be Prevented?

Queefing should never be considered as something shameful or embarrassing. You can’t really completely prevent it from happening. Nevertheless, if it’s too embarrassing for you or your partner, you can try to minimize the chances of a queef happening mid-sex.

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You should know that the more you thrust, the higher the chances of air getting pushed inside the vagina. Thus, one way to lessen the chances of a queef from occurring is by reducing in-out thrusting motions. You can grind in circular motions instead.

Doing this, however, may affect your sexual enjoyment. If you believe that an insignificant poofing noise shouldn’t affect your sexual satisfaction, then, by all means, thrust away.

If you don’t want your partner turning away in embarrassment and quitting mid-sex, you can do something to lessen the chances of a queef from happening. When you’re changing positions during sex, you can keep your penis inside your partner’s vagina.

Your penis will basically keep the air trapped inside your partner’s vaginal canal and prevent it from gushing out. When air can’t get out, a queef won’t happen. Of course, you may find it challenging to keep your penis inside your partner when you’re switching to a doggy position. You can also just ignore it when your partner queefs. It’s normal anyway.

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